Welcome to The Ballantine House.

Built in 1885, this mansion reveals many unseen stories of the skilled craftspeople who built the home, those who kept it running, and the Ballantine family who lived here. Contemporary art, historical objects, and new interactive experiences highlight the rich history and diversity of Newark’s many communities.

In late-19th-century Newark, craftspeople and industrial workers produced furniture, jewelry, leather goods, metal goods, beer, and many other products. World-class artists and musicians also have a vibrant history in this port city. Today, Newarkers still make beer, furniture, and other industrial products—and they also shine nationally and internationally in art, design, and entertainment.

As well as the historical rooms and two new introduction galleries, visitors will enjoy Made in Newark, an installation highlighting local artists and artisans, and the Listening Lounge, a music experience. Two new contemporary art installations and more are also on view:

  • Stay: The Black Women of 19th-Century Newark (2023) by Noelle Lorraine Williams
  • G.O.A.T. The Art Game (2023), a social sculpture by DARNstudio
  • Party Time: Reimagine America (2009) by Yinka Shonibare
  • Jewelry: From Pearls to Platinum to Plastic

What Has Been Happening at The Ballantine House?   

Welcome to The Ballantine House. In 1883, Jeannette and John Ballantine hired architect George Edward Harney to design this 27-room, three-story home for the family. Newark craftspeople built and decorated the House, completed in 1885, using complex techniques and the finest materials. Between 2021 and 2023, the Museum undertook a comprehensive, period-accurate project to restore the exterior and interior, engaging local contractors and conservators.

Yinka Shonibare, CBE, Party Time: Reimagine America, 2009. Mixed media. Purchase 2010 Helen McMahon Brady Cutting Fund | 2010.5.1‑66. © Yinka Shonibare, CBE. Photo by Richard Goodbody 

Ottie M. Carter, Hearts and Gizzards, between 1935‑1940. Cotton, 72 1/4 x 60 1/2 in. (183.5 x 153.7 cm). Gift of Dr. Dorothy O. Smith, 2012 | 2012.28. Photo by Richard Goodbody 

P. Ballantine and Sons, Ballantine’s Brown Stout bottle, 1937. Glass, metal, beer, paper. Gift of Paul Gallis, 1995 | 95.83. Photo by Richard Goodbody 

George Edward Harney, The Ballantine House, 1885. Brick, sandstone. Purchase 1937 | 37.646.1‑27. Photo by Richard Goodbody